Sunday, 20 June 2021

ProjectBACCHAE - adding some character(s)


Following on from his leopards comes Dionysos himself, accompanied by his wee mate Eros. These two will serve as the army mage-lord and rogue respectively. 

Dionysos is, far and away, the single most expensive model I have ever bought. Lets not talk about actual real-world moneys (after all, my wife might read this one day...), but suffice to say he is a custom designed miniature from Heroforge. 

There are only two off-the-shelf Dionysioi that I know of, from Foundry and from Wargods of Olympus. Both (in my opinion) overplay the drunkenness - one is more-or-less naked with bunch of grapes and a patera, and the other is ... very robust - a modern take on the god - holding a goblet. I wanted a much more understated, youthful and lithe figure holding a thyrsos. A god of exstasis (ecstasy, or being out of mind) and fertility.

After several visits to Heroforge, I umm'd and ahhh'd for a couple of weeks before placing the order, but here is the result. The stubby horns serve a couple of purposes - they are a clear divinising attribute, they tie in with Dionysos' bullish nature as a god of fertility, and reflect the stubby bull horns adorning the heads of several Hellenistic kings who may be referencing Dionysos on their coin portraits. As the army mage-lord, he will certainly be casting the confusion spell with gay abandon!

Another god of exstasis, Eros frequently appears in the company of Dionysos in ancient art - sometimes as an individual, and sometimes in plural, as erotes. I figure that Eros is more a rogue than a captain, and will be used to strike down enemy characters. If I have the points, I'll give him the 'winged boots of alacrity' to let him zoom around the battlefield. The figure is from a pack of 6 cherubs from Warmonger Miniatures - the other cherubs will be erotes charioteers if all goes according to plan. The wee amphora is from Castaway Arts.

9 comments:

  1. Excellent work Nic and I like your explanation of your ideas too.

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  2. Hey! Never belittle near nakedness with a bunch of grapes. Some of us in our later years prefer a Dionysus who reflects us. We make ourselves in our God’s image. Great work on your youthful and lithe look. 😀

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    1. Hahaha, I'm not exactly made in the image of the youthful, lithe Dionysos myself!

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  3. Nice :) I see on Google that D is supposed to have conquered the whole world except for Ethiopia and Britain. That’d make an interesting enemy army.

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    1. Yes, I'm hoping this will be a sort of grounded-in-myth-but-still-timeless army that I can happily use against any opponent without being worried whether the hats are the right shape for the period. :)

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  4. They are lovely, that's a superb paint job on Dionysos, you sir, are an artist as well as a scholar!

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  5. Excellent work and it is very interesting to read of the process you went through.

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